Clay Play

Gallery

This gallery contains 6 photos.

Did you know that you can take a pottery class here at LACF? Wander down Redwood street, where Thunder Alley is roaring.  To the right, behind the Millard Sheets Art Center, you’ll find it.  Tucked away behind a little courtyard … Continue reading

LACF in 40 Seconds

With so much construction going on this week, we did a walk-through of LACF to see what pre-Fair activities were happening. We stopped by our DIY Design Studio, the Flower & Garden Pavilion (this year’s theme is Mardi Gras), Luminasia and the Millard Sheets Art Center! Check out what our camera captured!

Our grounds will soon be transformed into what the 2015 LACF will be, so stay tuned for more Fair updates!

LACF is right around the corner!
What will be the FIRST thing you will do while at LACF?

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Perception of Beauty and Perfection

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

the art classic“I don’t see the world through the same lens as everybody else” – Jana Cruder

Jana Cruder is a fine-art photographer who is originally from Greensburg, PA – a small rural town outside of Pittsburgh. Since she spent all of her life in the East, coming to the West was very different and eye-opening. When she visited the Southwest on a photo trip, the lighting intrigued her. I guess you could say that she fell in love with our side of the country because after graduating, she moved to Los Angeles, where she has resided for over 10 years now.

Her creative process starts with a general idea of what she is trying to convey, and then she finds a location that will help her convey this idea.  In her series “What Lies Beneath,” Cruder is commenting on “the endless QUESTING young women in our culture do after the perfect ‘KEN.’” She is urging the viewer to think about where we get the idea of beauty from in culture, and how the Barbie doll can influence what we see as beautiful.

In her other photo series, “Great Expectations,” Cruder calls to attention to what happens when Barbie finds her perfect Ken. This series comments on the “great expectations” of young women to have a perfect husband, a home, and kids forming the ideal family unit. In the series the photos show that these great expectations are sometimes too much, and the ideals of a family unit are changing.

Jana selects her models very carefully. “I seek them out. Some are from agencies others are people I’ve met out and about… the look and feel of the models in my imagery is very important to the concept I’m talking about.”

Jana Cruder’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Jana’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Defying our Perception Limitations with Hyperrealism

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015.

the art classic

“I’m compelled to produce work that is visually poetic by using a medium that defies perceived limitations.” – Vincent Tomczyk

Vincent Tomczyk is a Los Angeles-based fine artist who despite not attending Art School, he is truly passionate about art and everything it entails. “I had always enjoyed painting, but [after taking an art class], I discovered that I was truly a sculptor.”

His sculptures can be categorized by the Hyperrealist style. Hyperrealism is a genre of painting and sculpture resembling a high-resolution photograph. He creates objects that are exactly how they would be in real life down to the smallest detail.

Tomczyk is not just recreating every day objects in great detail. He is creating these objects out of a very unique and fragile medium – paper. “The biggest challenge in creating a paper sculpture is making it structurally sound. I make a foam-core infrastructure in the areas that bear the most weight (foam-core is a 3/16” thick material that has a foam inner layer and 2 paper outer layers – the foam inside consist of more than 98% air, so its actually more paper than the name implies. Next, I layer with paper and add a Trompe L’oeil finish. For cushioned pieces, I add a canvas layer to the underside of the paper so that it doesn’t tear when I hand sew it.”

The reason that he creates these objects out of paper is to challenge perception. By making this chair out of paper, the function of this object is gone, and the form is the only thing that lasts. “By removing the object’s function I’m asking the viewer to consider what the object represents, not what it actually functions as.”

The form of the chairs are made so realistically that I would not be surprised if someone thought it was an actual chair and tried to sit on it. Tomczyk, himself, admitted to being fooled by the chairs function. “I nearly leaned on the Bergère once. I’m not sure if I was proud or embarrassed.”

Tomczyk’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Vincent’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Transgenic Animals – The Art Classic

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

the art classic

“Manipulation. Biotech, cloning, Dolly. Creating our pets. New species, unique breeds. Intensified features and traits.” –Josh Levine from his artist statement.

Josh Levine (aka Copyright 1972) is a multi-media artist that is originally from Miami. He attended art school in Chicago, then moved to Los Angeles.

He is interested in the blending of biology and technology. Technology has allowed us to cross breed animals to create non-natural new animal species.  An example of this in real life would be in house pets. Humans have cross bred dog species to make new dogs with desired traits such as friendliness, size and beauty.

In his sculptures he is expanding on the idea of cross breeding to create striking animal hybrids. Some of these hybrids resemble the original animals enough where you can guess the animal species that are being combined.

Some times the hybrid creature is so unique that the original animals that it was based on are not easily identifiable.

 

When asked whether these non-natural creations made from technology are good or bad for the world, he says neither. “Technology is inherently neutral. What we do with it is the issue.” It’s not the technology that is good or bad, it is what we humans

decide to use it for. Technological advancements with Nuclear energy have shown us that it can be a cheap and renewable energy source, or a super destructive bomb. The potential for this technology to be good or bad resides in what we decide to use it for.

Kids generally enjoy these pieces because of their flourishing imaginations. There are many similarities between these figures and fictional animal like characters from cartoons. “If kids had the financial decision to buy my art, I would be a rich person.”

Josh Levine’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Josh’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Visual Confusion – The Art Classic

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

the art classic

“I do a lot of commercial work, and over the years I have accumulated tons of line drawings. I take these line drawings, scan them into my computer, then mess with them and twist them all up.” – Tanner Goldbeck

Tanner Goldbeck is a contemporary artist from Los Angeles whose style originates from comic book art, but has now progressed to fine art. Tanner went to comic school in New Jersey. Once he graduated, he got a job with the skateboard company Powell Peralta and moved to Santa Barbara. While there he drew skulls and monster designs for skateboard decks and T-shirts. After a while he decided to move to LA and become a fine artist. In LA he has multiple freelance jobs for which he makes line drawings. He then scans these drawings to his computer, where he distorts the images, then uses it in his large-scale paintings.  “I can layer them in Photoshop and duplicate them, and I start making these weird abstracts.”

“I’m starting to go in the direction now where I slowly move away from recognizable images and go to completely abstract art.”

His newest project is drawing faces. This project started out with him drawing the faces of people he saw in a coffee shop on paper coffee cups. He then realized coffee cups were hard to preserve so he moved to drawing them on other mediums like paper, canvas and even vinyl records.

“Sometimes they are realistic, sometimes they are not. It depends on what mood I’m in that day.”

Tanner Goldbeck’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Tanner’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

 

 

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Binary Code: A Deceptively Simple Off or On

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

“Art that embodies the notion that it is just a matter of opening ones eyes and minds to these increasingly transparent dimensions creeping into our consciousness: a complex matrix of code & symbols burrowed in our neurology connecting the human with the virtual.” – Diane Silver

Diane Silver is a contemporary artist whose family comes from a long line of Los Angeles artists.  “I have always been an artist. My mother is an artist, my brother is an architect and my daughter is studying art and art history at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.”

Many of her pieces include Binary Code. “I am fascinated by the meeting up of the virtual and the physical worlds.  Binary code was a way of expressing this.”

Most of her work has a flaking/worn-out/scratched paint look. When asked about the artistic process to create this look she says “I lay down plaster and ink/graphite/wax and then manipulate the fabric which includes crunching, stomping, folding, sanding and water pressure – it can be quite cathartic.”

This piece is titled “Lamentation.” “The mouse represents humanity.  Throughout our lives we leave marks, some large some small.  It all seems so complicated but in reality we are all doing the same thing.”

Diane Silver’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Diane’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Ambitious Elements

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

Rachel Kaster is a Los Angeles-based multi-media contemporary artist specializing in crafting glass through different techniques.

“Conceptually, it is important for me that (my work) is glass,” Kaster said. She is fascinated by the dichotomies within the material – fragility, strength, clarity, lucidity, the way it traps the light.”

Kaster is originally from New York and there she learned to silversmith. With this skill, she began making jewelry. Her jewelry became bigger and bigger until, eventually, she learned how to cast metal in molds.

“I was casting small molds of silver, then I teamed up with a group that was making bronze and iron casts in a furnace that was similar to making glass.”

She has been working with glass for 13 years now and in her newest collection, titled Ambitious Elements, she is examining the unique combinations of glass with other elements like wood and metal.

She makes objects out of glass using the glass-casting technique.

“Pieces are made with chunks of glass in the mold and suspended above it. Then the piece is heated and the glass drips into the cavity.”

“I like to create a sense of mysterious fantasy, how did these objects come to be?”

“Like the axe and the stump. They are only one half on an unwritten story. It is for the viewer to complete this moment of fantasy.”

Rachel Kaster’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair, Sept. 4-27, to view Rachel’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Painting with the Subconscious Mind

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

“One of the things I try to do when I paint is try not to think.” Steve Jakobsen

Steve Jakobsen is a contemporary artist who is originally from Seattle. He went to school in Seattle for graphic design, and became a graphic designer in New York. He then joined a Mexican soccer team and moved to central Mexico. He said that this experience was a wake up call in his life. He came to the realization that “the whole world is absolutely different than America. People react to things differently. People actually care about things because their lives actually depend on it.”

After Mexico, he moved to Los Angeles and became a painter. As a painter, he tries to do the opposite of what he did as a graphic designer. “I try to get away from that when I’m painting. That’s too much of a process – too engineered.”

“[Painting] is a great time where I’m left alone and my head stops working. Screw the cerebral shit, and just let the lizard part of your brain, the frontal lobe just do whatever it needs to do. It will bring in everything you have experienced in life towards it and help you tell the story when you’re painting.”

When asked about artistic inspiration he said that “walking the streets is the biggest thing, and just riding my bike around the streets of Downtown LA.” He is interested in the community and the “behaviors, textures, motion, speed of flow, and what is going on.”

His artistic process starts with a sketchbook. He sketches just the general idea and layout, then transforms this to the canvas by using spray paint and oil to create the base of where things are going to go.

After this stage he lets his subconscious mind takeover.  His subconscious guides his hand to represent the things he has observed on the streets of Downtown LA. He lets his “Lizard Brain” as he calls it wander all over the canvas. This process makes it very hard to tell when it’s complete. “Knowing when to stop is very hard. It’s hard to stop.”

Steve Jakobsen’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Steve’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

The Formations of Caroline PM Jones

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

Caroline PM Jones is a British artist and sculptor now based in Los Angeles. Jones began painting twenty five years ago in the streets of Spain. She taught herself how to paint, and began a professional career as an artist in Asia. After spending more than ten years in Asia painting portraiture and seeing her family grow, Jones decided it was time to go on a new adventure, which ultimately led her to art school to study ornamental stone carving.

In her latest project, Formations, Jones is working with enormous rock formations in Joshua Tree National Park.

Her artistic process begins with studying the rock formations and creating sketches. “The first thing that I do is go to the location of the place I am studying and I sit outside and sketch profusely.” She starts sketching them with pastels on paper, then moves to oils on linen. “I like pencils and chalk, but I wanted more. I wanted that viscosity you can get with oil. I can create the form and color with loose brushstrokes.”

After weeks of studying and sketching the rock formation in the desert, she comes back to her Los Angeles studio and creates large scale paintings based on those sketches. She then sculps her own monoliths by carving stone and marble blocks. She also creates ceramic representations of the rock formations. These fired clay sculptures have purposefully undergone a process not dissimilar to the actual life cycle of the monoliths.

Jones’ work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Caroline’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

See you next Wednesday to learn about our next artist contributor. 

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather