Wonderland: A Floral Fairy Tale Comes to Life with Paint

Miriam Hellmann is a mural painter, fine artist and one of the creative forces behind the Wonderland: A Floral Fairy Tale exhibit. Lately she has been painting lively, colorful and amazing murals to bring the exhibit to life when September 1 arrives.

Hellmann snapped a selfie in front of one of the murals and posted it on her Instagram, @partydinosaur, where she has been posting some other behind the scenes looks at the exhibit paintings. 

With her bachelor of fine arts degree from University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Hellmann moved to the Los Angeles area to be a set painter. Now she is in the union for set painting and has painted for Disneyland, Universal Studios, Beyonce’s “Girls” music video, Toyota commercials and many more sets, videos and companies. She is bringing all of her experience to the Fair this year and is already creating amazing works of art.

Check them out!

Hellmann was inspired by previous versions of Alice in Wonderland, and aimed to represent the themes visually. She painted the book pictured above by giving the characters a life of their own and showing them coming off of the pages.

In the Wonderland: A Floral Fairy Tale exhibit you can expect to see huge flower displays, a hedgehog, live flamingos and other displays inspired by the classic storybook.

 

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Defying our Perception Limitations with Hyperrealism

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015.

the art classic

“I’m compelled to produce work that is visually poetic by using a medium that defies perceived limitations.” – Vincent Tomczyk

Vincent Tomczyk is a Los Angeles-based fine artist who despite not attending Art School, he is truly passionate about art and everything it entails. “I had always enjoyed painting, but [after taking an art class], I discovered that I was truly a sculptor.”

His sculptures can be categorized by the Hyperrealist style. Hyperrealism is a genre of painting and sculpture resembling a high-resolution photograph. He creates objects that are exactly how they would be in real life down to the smallest detail.

Tomczyk is not just recreating every day objects in great detail. He is creating these objects out of a very unique and fragile medium – paper. “The biggest challenge in creating a paper sculpture is making it structurally sound. I make a foam-core infrastructure in the areas that bear the most weight (foam-core is a 3/16” thick material that has a foam inner layer and 2 paper outer layers – the foam inside consist of more than 98% air, so its actually more paper than the name implies. Next, I layer with paper and add a Trompe L’oeil finish. For cushioned pieces, I add a canvas layer to the underside of the paper so that it doesn’t tear when I hand sew it.”

The reason that he creates these objects out of paper is to challenge perception. By making this chair out of paper, the function of this object is gone, and the form is the only thing that lasts. “By removing the object’s function I’m asking the viewer to consider what the object represents, not what it actually functions as.”

The form of the chairs are made so realistically that I would not be surprised if someone thought it was an actual chair and tried to sit on it. Tomczyk, himself, admitted to being fooled by the chairs function. “I nearly leaned on the Bergère once. I’m not sure if I was proud or embarrassed.”

Tomczyk’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Vincent’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

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Binary Code: A Deceptively Simple Off or On

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

“Art that embodies the notion that it is just a matter of opening ones eyes and minds to these increasingly transparent dimensions creeping into our consciousness: a complex matrix of code & symbols burrowed in our neurology connecting the human with the virtual.” – Diane Silver

Diane Silver is a contemporary artist whose family comes from a long line of Los Angeles artists.  “I have always been an artist. My mother is an artist, my brother is an architect and my daughter is studying art and art history at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.”

Many of her pieces include Binary Code. “I am fascinated by the meeting up of the virtual and the physical worlds.  Binary code was a way of expressing this.”

Most of her work has a flaking/worn-out/scratched paint look. When asked about the artistic process to create this look she says “I lay down plaster and ink/graphite/wax and then manipulate the fabric which includes crunching, stomping, folding, sanding and water pressure – it can be quite cathartic.”

This piece is titled “Lamentation.” “The mouse represents humanity.  Throughout our lives we leave marks, some large some small.  It all seems so complicated but in reality we are all doing the same thing.”

Diane Silver’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Diane’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

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Painting with the Subconscious Mind

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

“One of the things I try to do when I paint is try not to think.” Steve Jakobsen

Steve Jakobsen is a contemporary artist who is originally from Seattle. He went to school in Seattle for graphic design, and became a graphic designer in New York. He then joined a Mexican soccer team and moved to central Mexico. He said that this experience was a wake up call in his life. He came to the realization that “the whole world is absolutely different than America. People react to things differently. People actually care about things because their lives actually depend on it.”

After Mexico, he moved to Los Angeles and became a painter. As a painter, he tries to do the opposite of what he did as a graphic designer. “I try to get away from that when I’m painting. That’s too much of a process – too engineered.”

“[Painting] is a great time where I’m left alone and my head stops working. Screw the cerebral shit, and just let the lizard part of your brain, the frontal lobe just do whatever it needs to do. It will bring in everything you have experienced in life towards it and help you tell the story when you’re painting.”

When asked about artistic inspiration he said that “walking the streets is the biggest thing, and just riding my bike around the streets of Downtown LA.” He is interested in the community and the “behaviors, textures, motion, speed of flow, and what is going on.”

His artistic process starts with a sketchbook. He sketches just the general idea and layout, then transforms this to the canvas by using spray paint and oil to create the base of where things are going to go.

After this stage he lets his subconscious mind takeover.  His subconscious guides his hand to represent the things he has observed on the streets of Downtown LA. He lets his “Lizard Brain” as he calls it wander all over the canvas. This process makes it very hard to tell when it’s complete. “Knowing when to stop is very hard. It’s hard to stop.”

Steve Jakobsen’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Steve’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

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Photograph or Painting?

By Guest Blogger, Patrick Bollinger

A profile series on the artists and individuals of The Art Classic, one of this year’s exhibitions at the LA County Fair – September 4-27, 2015

Tom Lamb is an aerial landscape photographer based in Laguna Beach, California. In 1980, Tom founded Lamb Studio, a design, communications and photography workshop focused on environmental and cultural interpretation efforts. His work is published, exhibited and collected internationally.

“…Some context, these are aerial photos (not lithos or etchings or paintings) that are NOT manipulated … they are pretty crazy and wonderful.”
- Peter Mays, Executive Director – Los Angeles Art Association – Gallery 825

At first glance, I could not figure out what this picture was. The photograph looked like a mixture of shapes, lines and colors that reminded me of an abstract painting. After inspecting it more closely I realized that this was not an abstract painting, but rather an aerial view of land. These shapes and lines were not random brushstrokes, but actual marks on Earth. As Lamb dangles precariously from the side of a helicopter thousands of feet in the air, he is able to capture the never before seen effect of mankind’s impact on our landscape and present it to us as an abstraction of this reality, left for us to interpret its ultimate purpose.

Lamb’s work focuses primarily on the environment and is largely influenced by:

“The environment, culture, conservation and the balance of man’s mark on the planet – especially his mark’s on the land and interplay of nature and time.”

His LA river series showcases his focus on the environment and the coexistence of nature and humans.

“I became interested with the LA River working with ASLA (American Society of Landscape Architects) and TPL (Trust for Public Lands) 15 years ago on a special aerial project to document the full length of the river from Chatsworth to Long Beach.”

This was once a normal river that ran through the LA area, but humans have now diverted its flow into man made cement canals.  We have also affected the color of this water through pollution, and now it is a dull looking dark green. In his photography Lamb capture’s land that we have changed from its natural state for our human needs, and shows it to us from a perspective that is rarely seen.

Tom Lamb’s work will be featured in the Millard Sheets Art Center’s upcoming exhibition The Art Classic.

Please join us this year at the LA County Fair to view Tom’s work and the other artists profiled in this series from the Los Angeles Art Association who were selected for this year’s exhibition.

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